News Archive

WMSCI 2017

Jun 28, 2017

On July 11, The Standish Group and a newly minted graduate student will make two important presentations at the World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics:.WMSCI 2017.  At 1 O’clock PM Professor Jim Johnson keynote is titled: CHAOS Update: CHAOS Update, Nanocources, the Winning Hand, and the root cause of IT Project Failure.  At 10 O’clock AM Eaglan Kurek will present his research on the value of Enterprise Architecture.

July 11 1PM WMSCI  2017

CHAOS Update: CHAOS Update, Nanocources, the Winning Hand, and the root cause of IT Project Failure

Last year, Jim Johnson and Hans Mulder outlined the new CHAOS University System, which is a partnership with The Standish Group, University of Antwerp, and the Antwerp Management School.  This year Jim Johnson will outline the progress to date and future planned efforts.  A major feature of forthcoming programs will focus on nanocourses and lifelong learning events.  The second part of the talk will spotlight new discoveries.  Using the CHAOS Database, we found the root causes of most project success and value.

In the session, we will explore:

  •  CHAOS University progress
  •  Nanocourses and lifelong learning events
  •  The Winning Hand
  •  Marginal PM activities
  •  Root cause of project success & value

 

July 11 10 AM WMSCI  2017

The Value of Enterprise Architecture

Eaglan Kurek presents his exploratory study on the value of Enterprise Architecture (EA). In his exploratory study it partially answers this question by looking at the value of EA on IT projects. The major part of his research was performed by mining The Standish Group’s CHAOS database. He investigated the success of projects by comparing before and after the implementation of an EA practice. We also relied on previous research. 

In the session, he will explore:

  • Defining Enterprise Architecture (EA).
  • Major attributes of EA
  • Previous EA studies Results
  • CHAOS Database EA Results
  • Future EA research projects

Eaglan Kurek is an enterprise architect and helps companies implement their information and business strategy. Eaglan recently graduated with great distinction from the Antwerp Management School (University of Antwerp) with a Master of Science degree in Enterprise IT Architecture. Mr. Kurek currently is part of Realdolmen, a large independent IT services provider/consultancy in Belgium. 

Digital Transformation Project Report

Nov 17, 2016

Just released a special report on Digital Transformation Projects. The Special CHAOS Report on Digital Transformation Projects follows the same outline and datapoints of the normal CHAOS Reports, but segmenting the Digital Transformation Projects. Like The CHAOS Report 2016, this special report presents the data in different forms with many charts. The charts included have the resolution by size, industry, type, method, complexity, strategic alignment, and capability. All of the charts come from the CHAOS database from the fiscal years 2007 or 2008 to 2016. The following is the outline of the report:

Page 1: Introduction: Chart: The Traditional resolution of all projects and DTP projects from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database. Traditional resolution is OnTime, OnBudget, and OnTarget.

Page 2: Modern DTP Resolution: Chart: The Modern resolution of all projects and DTP projects from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database. Modern resolution is OnTime, OnBudget with a satisfactory result.

Page 3: DTP Resolution by Size: Chart: Caption: The resolution of DTPs by size from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 4: Complexity: Chart: The resolution of DTPs by complexity from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 5:  Size-Complexity Matrix: Chart: The Size-Complexity Matrix provides guidelines for categorizing a project in order to assess the risk and effort.

Page 6: Size-Complexity Matrix Guidelines: Two Charts: 1) Guidelines on how to measure the size of a project and 2) Guidelines on how to measure the complexity of a project.

Page 7: Project Sponsor: Chart: The resolution of DTPs by the skill level of the project sponsor from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 8: Emotional Maturity: Chart: The resolution of DTPs by the emotional maturity skill level of the project team from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 9: Competent Staff: Chart: The resolution of DTPs by capability from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 10:  Optimization: The resolution of DTPs by the optimization skill level of the project team from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 11: Agile Process: Two Charts 1) Growth of agile projects and decline of waterfall projects within the CHAOS Database from 2008 to 2016 and 2) The resolution of DTPs by agile versus waterfall from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 12: Project Manager: Chart: The resolution of DTPs by project manager skill levels from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 13: Type of Projects: Chart: The resolution of DTPs by type from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 14: Goal: Chart: The value of DTPs by goal from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 15: Industry: Chart: The resolution of DTPs by industry from FY2007–2016 within the CHAOS database.

Page 16: Factors of Success/Value: Table: reflects our opinion of the importance of each attribute and our recommendation for the amount of effort and investment that should be considered to improve DTP success and value.   

Page 17: Summary: Provides 10 recommendations to achieve value and success for a DTP

Page 18: Value Optimization Service: overview of the program which results in a closed-loop system of continuous self-reflection and improvement.

The Special CHAOS Report on Digital Transformation Projects is available free to members in our report sections of our website dashboard.  Non-members can purchase the report in our company store.

 

Grand Opening of the Sponsor Resource Center

Oct 20, 2016

Sponsor Resource Center

The Sponsor Resource Center has several products and services to improve project sponsorship.   If you are a project professional or a project sponsor we can help. 

For the project sponsor we have 3 resources.  First take our short 10-question evaluation. Free when you register.  Second, purchase and read our new book, The Good Sponsor and do the exercises.  The book outlines the 50 skills need to be a good sponsor and provides exercises and assessments on those skills.  Last take the full 50-skills assessment.  This assessment will provide you with a score and benchmark report.  The 5-page report provides suggestions to act on to get better at the most important skills you need to improve to be a better sponsor.  You can purchase the assessment in our store.

For the project professional we have 2 resources.   First is our new book, Jackie and the Three Bears.  This is a fun book with a serious message.  The book outlines an interview process with 3 different bears on the important skills of a project sponsor.   It draws conclusions on what makes a good sponsor.  It also doubles as a doodle book and notebook.  You can purchase this book in our LuLu Store.  Second is our Executive Sponsor Research Report. Executive Sponsor Research Report is a concise overview of the outcomes based on the skill-levels of the project sponsor.  The report also outlines roles, responsibilities, and skills needed to be an effective executive sponsor. You can also purchase this book in our LuLu Store.

Other books and reports go to our LuLu Spotlight.

 

Savings Jimmy

Aug 8, 2016

 

The Standish Group announces the publication of Jim Johnson’s second book for children.  Saving Jimmy is a fun story about a lost boy. The Adventures of Jackie series provides easy to understand basic project management lessons aimed at children. Jackie the Squirrel is a project manager. Jackie enjoys solving problems through managing projects. In saving Jimmy, Jackie first observes Jimmy wandering around woods looking lost. Jackie decides to make a plan to save Jimmy from freezing. Jackie then acquires resources and executes the plan.  This graphic book demonstrates project management lessons through colorful and delightful common forest birds and animals.  Each page is a unique hand painted work of art by Kayla Johnson. 

To get your copy go to lulu.com

CHAOS University System

Jul 12, 2016

The Standish Group (Standish) and Antwerp Management School (AMS) are creating a network of schools, professors, and students to advance the study of what makes software efforts valuable.  The center of the network is the CHAOS Database.  In cooperation with the AMS, Standish will open the world-renowned CHAOS Database exclusively for access to professors and students of the network for research and teaching purposes. The network of Standish, AMS, and other stakeholders is known as CHAOS University System (CUS). Together, Standish and AMS will develop a doctoral and master’s educational program around the updating and extending of the CHAOS Database. The educational program will include learning how to conduct organizational workshops, evaluating projects, and creating project appraisal reports.

The CUS working group will be made up of the first ten universities to join the CUS Network. The prime responsibility of the working group is to recruit and approve new members. The second responsibility is for each school to represent four other schools for purpose of thought leadership and educational advancements. CUS plans to have 40 more schools join the network, for a total of 50 schools. CUS will apply for grants to fund the network and provide scholarships to graduate students back to CUS membership network.

Recently Standish and AMS participated in the 10th International Multi-Conference on International Institute of Informatics and Systemics (IIIS) Conference in Orlando, FL.  The main purpose of the IIIS is to foster knowledge integration processes, interdisciplinary communication, and integration of academic and commercial activities.  Standish/AMS presentations on the CUS network receive very positive feedback and great interest from the professors and schools that made up the delegation.  Please see a short video of Dr. Nagib Callaos, Conference General Chair and Jim Johnson talk about the contribution to the IIIS Conference.

If you would like to be part of this new and exciting program or learn more about it, please complete the partnership and participation application or contact Jennifer Lynch at Jennifer@standishgroup.com

 

 

CHAOS Report 2016: The Winning Hand

Apr 18, 2016

Today, we released the “CHAOS Report 2016: The Winning Hand”. The CHAOS Report 2016 updates the 2015 report which focused on presenting the data in different forms with many charts. Most of the updated charts come from the CHAOS database from the fiscal years 2012 to 2016. However, some the charts look at the whole database from 2007 to 2016.  Other focus on a single year. The CHAOS fiscal year starts March 1 and runs until the end of February.  A highlight of this report is our analysis and thought leadership what makes a winning hand and what makes a losing hand. This is outline of the report:

Page 1 Winning Hand: is a description of the attributes of the winning hand.  We also outline the attibutes of a losing hand.  There is one chart on this page title is Winning Hand versus Losing Hand.  It shows the results of success and value from the CHAOS Database 2012 to 2016.

Page 2 Project Size: is a discussion of the size of projects with regard to both success and value. On this page we display 2 pie charts Value for Large Projects, and Value for Small Projects for the year 2016 from the CHAOS Database.  We also display 2 tables: Project Size by CHAOS Resolution and CHAOS Resolution by Project Size.  These tables are also from the CHAOS Database from 2012 to 2016.

Page 3 Agile versus Waterfall: compares the resolution of all software projects segmented by the agile process, waterfall method and other.  We also break down agile and waterfall by size. We also discuss agile in name only.  Our one table on this page is resolution by method.  The results are from the CHAOS Database from 2012 to 2016.

Page 4 Traditional Resolution: is presented and discussed as well the six individual attributes to measuring success.  On this page we display 3 pie charts one table: OnBudget, OnTime, and OnTarget.  All 3 pie charts are for 2016 from the CHAOS Database.  We also display the Traditional Resolution for all projects table from 2012 to 2016.

Page 5 Modern Resolution: is defined and presented on this page.  On this page we display 3 pie charts by value, goal, and satisfaction. and Modern Resolution for All Projects. All 3 pie charts are for 2016 from the CHAOS Database.  We also display the Modern Resolution for all projects table from 2012 to 2016.

Page 6 Resolution by Industry: provides view of the CHAOS database from an industry standpoint. On this page we display 2 pie charts satisfaction level for healthcare projects and satisfaction level for telecom projects We also display a table shows the modern resolution of  CHAOS Resolution by Industry. All data is from the CHAOS Database from 2012 to 2016.

Page 7  World Area: show resolution of projects of 4 major geographical areas of the world. The main table on this page is CHAOS Resolution by each Area of the World. On this page we also display 2 pie charts with the emotional maturity skills of success projects and failed projects. Emotional maturity is relevant to the difference in success for major areas of the world. Data for the Area table is from the CHAOS Database from 2012 to 2016.  Data for emotional maturity is from the CHAOS Database from 2007 to 2016.

Page 8 Project Type: has a major effect on resolution. On this page we have one table that depicts CHAOS Resolution by Project Type. On this page we also display 2 pie charts. The first pie chart is Small Modernization Projects with a skilled executive sponsor.  The second pie chart is large purchased off-the-shelf application software with extensive modifications with an unskilled executive sponsor.  Data for the table and pie charts are from the CHAOS Database from 2012 to 2016.

Page 9 Complexity: discusses how we determine and appraise complexity. On this page we have one table that depicts the resolution of all software projects by complexity from 2012–2016 within the CHAOS database.  We also have 2 pie charts showing resolution of small easy projects and large, complex projects.  Data for both pie charts comes from the CHAOS Database from 2007 to 2016.

Page 10 Goal:  discusses the rating of goal. On this page we have one table that depicts the resolution of all software projects by goal from 2012–2016 within the CHAOS database.  We also have 2 pie charts showing resolution of small, loose to vague and small, close to precise projects.  Data for both pie charts comes from the CHAOS Database from 2007 to 2016.

Page 11 Skilled Staff: is a look at project resolution by capability. On this page we have one table that depicts the resolution of all software projects by capability from 2012–2016 within the CHAOS database. We also have 2 pie charts showing resolution of very high-value projects by skill-level and very low-value projects by skill-level.  Data for both pie charts comes from the CHAOS Database from 2007 to 2016.

Page 12: Factors of Success/Value: reflects our opinion of the importance of each attribute and our recommendation of the amount of effort and investment that should be considered to improve project success and value.  On this page we display a table of 2016 CHAOS Factors of Success with investment recommendation.

The new CHAOS report: 2016 Edition is only available to members in our report sections of our website dashboard.  We have a special membership offering to be able to access to this report, other reports and services. Go here to join.

The Dead Presidents’ Guide to Project Management

Apr 2, 2016

Essential Lessons for Project Managers and Sponsors

This new book is written by Jim Johnson

The president of the United States, when in office, is the most powerful person in the world. As of this writing, there are only 38 men, from George Washington to Ronald Reagan, who have held this esteemed office and who have gone to the great White House in the sky. Currently there are five former presidents who are still above ground. It is important to note that most of these men were duly elected to the office by the majority of the citizens of the United States. Just getting to the office is a major accomplishment, and it took skill and perseverance to rise above their contemporaries to reach the zenith of all positions.

The Dead Presidents’ Guide to Project Management considers 38 brief lessons that these great men have bestowed upon us. It is the author’s opinion that the job of president of the United States requires a lot of the same strengths and characteristics needed by both project managers and executive sponsors. Most projects need both a strong, skilled executive sponsor and a project manager (or if an organization follows an agile methodology such as Scrum, then a Scrum master and product owner); and both positions can learn from our dead presidents.

Go to Lulu to get your copy Today!

2015 Five Deadly Sins Report

Dec 4, 2015

Today, we updated the 5 Deadly Sins Report. The Law of the 5 Deadly Sins report defines the 5 deadly sins, explains their effect on software projects.  The report suggests ways to deal with them to improve project success and value. CHAOS Members can access the updated report through their dashboard. www.standishgroup.com

Triple Play

Aug 31, 2015

The Standish Group is providing three important services around our Factors of Value research.  The purpose of the Factors of Value research is to consider elements that have a high likely to increase the value of your software project investments. 

1.              The first service is a Factors of Value video.  The seven-minute Factors of Value video outlines the Top Ten attributes that return the highest value of IT projects and investments.

2.              The second service is a Factors of Value Research Report. The idea of this report is to define and explain the Factors of Value.

3.              The third service is a Factors of Value benchmark.  The purpose of this benchmark is to compare your value skills against 1,000 other organizations.

The seven-minute Factors of Value video is on our home page.  Please watch the video. At the end of the video you will find a code.  Write the code down to get the Factors of Value Research Report.  There are four steps to get the report:

Step 1: Go to sample research page;

Step 2: Click on the Factors of Value under skills assessment;

 ;Step 3: Fill out the registration form;

Step 4: In the comment field type the code.  

You will then get e-mailed a link to download the report. After reading the report you will be prepared to take the skills assessment and benchmark. 

The benchmark process is simple.  There are four steps to get the benchmark report:

Step 1: Go to sample research page;

Step 2: Click on Factors of Value under skills assessment;

Step 3: Fill out the benchmark form;

Step 4: Complete the 10 skills assessment questions.

You will then get e-mailed a link to download the benchmark report. The report provides a score based on our research and is benchmarked against more than 1,000 other organizations. It also includes suggestions for improvement. Answering the assessment questions should take about 10 minutes. 

 

Money Pit: The True Cost of a Project

Aug 19, 2015

Today, we released Money Pit: The True Cost of a Project. The purpose of this research note is to consider the true cost of a project. This research note also updates the original 2012 The True Cost of a Project white paper. For this report we examine the cost of two similar projects in the Standish database undertaken in two very different environments—a mature institutional environment (Fat) and an agile environment (Lean)—against the true cost, which includes hidden costs. The Standish Group has conducted in-depth research on what makes up a project budget. This report has been greatly influenced by mining the current CHAOS database, which has more than 50,000 project profiles and users surveys of IT Executives on the breakdown of project costs.

This is the outline of the report:

Page 1: Introduction: is where we introduce the cost items and activities that make the cost items and budgets. On this page we have two tables.  Table 1 is Activity Inclusion.  This is The Standish Group’s opinion of the percentage of time certain activities are included in the project budget. Table 2 is Major PM Activity.  This is The Standish Group’s opinion of how much time is spent on common project management activities. We have segmented these activities by agile versus traditional methods.

Page 2:  Outlines the common stages of a project and break down the costs by stages. We also introduce Stanmets. On this page we have two tables.  Table 3 is Fat and Lean Projects by Stages.  The table breaks down the cost into classic stages and looks at actual costs and true costs.  Table 4 is Stanmets by Industry  Here we provide the average cost per Stanmet by industry.

Page 3:  Presents Stage 1 Business Justification,  Here we break down the cost of Business Justification by major activity. On page three we have one table. Table 5 is Business Justification Costs.  This table breakdown is of the true cost by activity in Stage 1 for the Fat project and the Lean program.

Page 4: Presents Stage 2 requirements and design. Here we break down the cost of requirements and design by major activity. On page four we have one table. Table 6 is Requirements and Design Costs.  This table breakdown is of the true cost by activity in Stage 2 for the Fat project and the Lean program.

Page 5: Presents Stage 3 development and testing. Here we break down the cost of development and testing by major activity. On page five we have one table. Table 7 is development and testing Costs.  This table breakdown is of the true cost by activity in Stage 3 for the Fat project and the Lean program.

Page 6:  Presents Stage 4 implementation and education. Here we break down the cost of implementation and education by major activity. On page six we have one table. Table 8 is implementation and education Costs.  This table breakdown is of the true cost by activity in Stage 4 for the Fat project and the Lean program.

Page 7: Presents and segments the project/program into six major activities,  A highlight is the cost of meetings. We also compare and contrast the project and program management services.  On this page we have two tables.  Table 9 is Major Cost Items. The table shows the cost of major project items across all stages of the project. Table 10 is project management cost comparison. This table estimates percentage of actual project management costs across different segments.

Page 8: Presents how Lean executes the project. These is one large  progress table showing the flow of projects.

Page 9: is a summary, wrap-up and final conclusions. Money Pit: The True Cost of a Project Report is available to members in our report section of our website Dashboard. Non-members can join in our store.

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